Description

Scoliosis is a curving of the spine. The spine curves away from the middle or sideways.

Symptoms

A doctor may suspect scoliosis if one shoulder appears to be higher than the other, or the pelvis appears to be tilted. Untrained observers often do not notice the curving in the earlier stages.

Other symptoms can include:

  • Backache or low-back pain
  • Fatigue
  • Shoulders or hips appear uneven
  • Spine curves abnormally to the side (laterally)

There may be fatigue in the spine after prolonged sitting or standing. Pain will become persistent if there is irritation to the soft tissue and wear and tear of the spine bones.

What to expect from therapy

Treatment depends on the cause of the scoliosis, the size and location of the curve, and how much more growing the patient is expected to do.

Most cases of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (less than 20 degrees) require no treatment, but should be checked often, about every 6 months.

As curves get worse (above 25 to 30 degrees in a child who is still growing), bracing is usually recommended to help slow the progression of the curve.

There are many different kinds of braces used. The Boston Brace, Wilmington Brace, Milwaukee Brace, and Charleston Brace are named for the centers where they were developed. Each brace looks different. There are different ways of using each type properly.

The selection of a brace and the manner in which it is used depends on many factors, including the specific characteristics of the curve. The exact brace will be decided on by the patient and health care provider.

A back brace does not reverse the curve. Instead, it uses pressure to help straighten the spine. The brace can be adjusted with growth.

Bracing does not work in congenital or neuromuscular scoliosis, and is less effective in infantile and juvenile idiopathic scoliosis.

The choice of when to have surgery will vary. After the bones of the skeleton stop growing, the curve should not get much worse. Because of this, the surgeon may want to wait until your child’s bones stop growing. But your child may need surgery before that if the curve in his or her spine is severe or is getting worse quickly. Curves of 40 degrees or greater usually require surgery.

Surgery involves correcting the curve (although not all the way) and fusing the bones in the curve together. The bones are held in place with one or two metal rods held down with hooks and screws until the bone heals together. Sometimes surgery is done through a cut in the back, on the abdomen, or beneath the ribs.

A brace may be required to stabilize the spine after surgery. The limitations imposed by the treatments are often emotionally difficult and may threaten self-image, especially of teenagers. Emotional support is important.

Physical therapists and orthotists (orthopedic appliance specialists) can help explain the treatments and make sure the brace fits comfortably.

Learn more about how HealthReach therapists can help

Schedule your initial consultation today by calling us at 1-262-780-0707.

Click here to see our locations and to find a therapist near you.

Resources

Visit our resource center for videos and more information on occupational, physical and speech therapy.

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KidReach pediatric therapy specialists, Milwaukee, Brookfield, Hales Corners, Wisconsin